Week 3 feature profile thingy

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Week 3 feature profile thingy

Post  Hannah on Fri Feb 12, 2010 4:41 am

1) Publication demographics (Maria)

2) Rationale - Angle, house style, language, word count (Mainly Hannah)

3) Where in the publication will it go? - Double page? Emotional basis (?)

4) 2 paragraphs - Headline, stand first (Sue)

5) 2 paragraphs (Ali)

6) Quotes, extra info sidebars (Carol)

Hannah

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Re: Week 3 feature profile thingy

Post  Hannah on Fri Feb 12, 2010 4:45 am

Feature info collating thingy

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“Make sense of your world”

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‘If Psychologies is a success, it will give advertisers access to successful, affluent women over 35, with money to spend on life-changing, high-value goods. Hachette claims the beauty, food and automotive sectors are likely to provide Psychologies with its most important advertisers.’

Word count: 1,106 [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] :
From sexed-up Dsiney toys to seven-year-olds on diets, our 'tweens' are exposed to a highly adult world. But to what effect, asks Laura Bond, and are we about to see a shift?
Twenty years ago, if you went in to a nine-year-old girl’s bedroom you might find a Barbie doll dressed in a ball gown, a sticker album and a wardrobe filled with pretty party dresses. Take a peek inside a nine-year-old’s room today and the image is quite different. Beyoncé or Britney might lead you to the right door and when you open it you’re likely to find a girl in skinny jeans, throwing her head back and gyrating to the music. A Bratz doll in over-the-knee boots might be perched on a deck chair next to a computer, which displays a coquettish photo the girl has uploaded onto her MySpace page.
‘We’re living in a toxic soup of images,’ says Maggie Hamilton, author of What’s Happening To Our Girls? (Viking). ‘When we see all this porn and nudity we judge it from a lifetime of experience, but young girls have no such framework, so they assume, for instance, that you do have oral and anal sex at 12.’
Once firmly cocooned in the category of childhood, 12 is now at the upper end of what marketers have coined the ‘tweenage’ years. Redefining an age bracket is nothing new. In the 1950s, American marketers invented the term ‘teen’, in order to sell jeans and rock ’n’ roll. But while teenager is an inclusive term, the tween is a distinctly female, commercial label for children aged seven to 13.
The rise of the tweenager has coincided with rapid social change. Rampant consumerism – we spend £100 billion a year on our children – and a boom in digital technology mean kids today are brand conscious and sex savvy. Pornography is ubiquitous and unavoidable – Google something for homework and you might find yourself witnessing violent sex – and our morality is becoming increasingly relaxed. While an explicit clip on MTV might make us feel uncomfortable, we’ve come to the conclusion that if it’s in demand it must be OK.
But this complacency is creating a generation of girls who think that looking ‘hot’ is their life’s work. A 2009 study found that 46 per cent of 11- to 16-year-old girls would consider cosmetic surgery, while one in five 11-year-olds is trying to lose weight. Hamilton believes a whole generation of kids are now having more narrow life experiences. ‘To develop the brain, kids need to be out there in the world – playing with pots and pans, eating worms, running through the park – but now they’re sitting in their bedrooms, surrounded by branded toys
A world of makeovers
Bratz dolls are a popular tween accessory. Marketed in bikinis, sitting in hot tubs, mixing drinks, today’s girls aspire to live this pneumatic lifestyle. Even traditional toys are being sexed up. Today’s Disney characters – the Little Mermaid and Jasmine – have more cleavage, fewer clothes and are depicted as sexier than previous heroines such as Snow White and Cinderella. A recent study from the University of Florida found girls aged three to six weren’t influenced by exposure to thin, beautiful princesses in movies, but the researchers suggested that older girls were more likely to be affected.
According to Dr Sharon Lamb, psychology professor and co-author of Packaging Girlhood (St Martin’s Griffin), girls today are rewarded for appearing sexy. ‘It plays into their self-worth, because that’s what gets them attention in society,’ she says. And it’s even harder for younger girls. Dr Joe Tucci of the Australian Childhood Foundation has expressed concern that teachers were seeing six-, seven- and eight-year-olds involved in ‘coercive, manipulative sexual behaviours’, due to what he saw as ‘a confusion around what sexuality means’. A 2009 survey by the NSPCC and the University of Bristol found that nine out of 10 girls between 14 and 17 had been in an intimate relationship.
Adults who look after these girls are losing their grip. ‘The teachers I spoke with were questioning whether they can continue to do their job because a lot of what they’re dealing with is so overwhelming,’ says Hamilton. Faced with the knowledge that girls under 16 are having threesomes and giving blow jobs (there’s a teen party game where the aim is to get the most girls to ‘go down’ on you), it’s hardly surprising that teachers are tired of dealing with the emotional fall-out.
But why are girls willing to take part in such degrading activities? According to Hamilton, it’s due to unprecedented levels of anxiety and a lack of confidence. ‘Tweens are leading battery hen existences. They don’t have friendships across the generations, which would allow them to hear stories about how to navigate tricky situations. They look to celebrity culture for their information.’
Dr Michael Carr-Gregg, psychologist and author of The Princess Bitchface Syndrome (Penguin), says, ‘Many of the girls I see today are spiritual anorexics. They believe in little and seek to fill this emptiness by buying things, or by living their lives through soap stars and reality TV shows.’We’ve come to accept that picking apart a celebrity’s appearance is part of the gossip-magazines’ game, but the vitriol is now seeping into the news in general. ‘The tabloids hold women politicians up to scrutiny, and focus particularly on their looks,’ says Walter. ‘It makes young girls think women who go into politics aren’t very feminine and I think it affects their ambitions.’
The beginnings of change
Walter believes parents have had their heads buried in the sand. ‘I’d rather pretend that my friends and I live in a nice little bubble, but I think we’re starting to realise that all this isn’t OK,’ she says. But she thinks we’re on the cusp of change. ‘Over the past six months we have started to see more unease expressed,’ says Walter. The Times recently introduced a regular ‘Babe Watch’ column, where readers expose casual sexism (in a recent letter a woman mentioned a nipple-tassle T-shirt available in ‘nipper sizes’, six to 12 months).
Then there are the grass roots organisations: Object, which covers lads’ mags with slogans such as ‘This insults all women’, and a group of mothers have started a campaign against the ‘pinkification’ of girls’ lives. Walter’s book finds itself in good company: The Lolita Effect by MG Durham (Gerald Duckworth & Co) was published last year and What’s Happening To Our Girls? caused a sensation in Australia. ‘What we have to realise is that these girls are reflecting back to us our values,’ says Hamilton. ‘And that is a very hard pill to swallow.’

Hannah

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Re: Week 3 feature profile thingy

Post  Hannah on Fri Feb 12, 2010 7:57 am

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There's a few more articles on him for you guys, also I've been reading his entry in my sister's Vogue fasion book, I won't type the whole thing, but here are some good bits:

'Self-styled bad boy of Paris couture'

'was discovered by Vogue stylist Isabella Blow... she took the collection [from his MA show] and wore it in a Vogue shoot in November 1992'

'Blow... persuaded McQueen to change his name from Lee to the more exotic-sounding Alexander'

'McQueen... brilliant at self-publicity and causing controversy; much has been made of his working-class roots, cockney accent and outspoken opinions'

'On graduating [from his MA], he formed his own line and then had a hit: his bumster trousers - a style that exposed the upper part of the posterior... caused a minor sensation and made his name.'

'Received the British Designer of the Year Award 1996'

'slated everyone in his wake including Vivienne Westwood and John Galliano. Hubert de Givenchy - the founder of the house and one of the most respected designers of the century - was dismissed as irrelevant by McQueen.'

'McQueen's first collection for Givency was universally panned... he had the grace to admit it himself 'I know it was crap,' he told American Vogue in October 1997 with typical candour...'

'...triumphs include Kate Winslet's wedding dress in 1999.'

' 'If you want a starving Ethiopian on a jacket, then come to McQueen in London,' he told Vogue in 1997. 'If you want luxury, come to Givenchy. I do both. I'm a fashion schizophrenic.' '


I've managed to find a picture of him with Kate Moss, a picture of the wedding dress he designed for Kate Winslet and there are some pictures in the Vogue book I can scan as well if necessary.

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Re: Week 3 feature profile thingy

Post  Maria on Sat Feb 13, 2010 9:02 am

I went on the ABC website and found out the following information:

Psychologies Magazine (1 July 2009 - 31 December 2009) 6 issues

Total average net circulation per issue - 130,860

Average Net Circulation - Psychologies Travel Edition - 16,763
Pyschologies Standard Edition - 114,097

I also looked at the NRS website for the readership statistics. It is a little confusing so i would be grateful if someone could give a second opinion on how to interpret the data.
The website is: [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] and the data is found in the pdf file 'women's magazines Oct 08 - Sept 09'

The magazine is listed under Women's monthly periodicals and so is aimed at women.
- The total adult readership is 359
- 274 adults are from the A, B and C1 classes and therefore are the main readers
- the readers are mainly from the 15 - 44 age bracket (206 adults)
- the total amount of female readers are 318 and the total amount of male readers are 41.

I hope this is alright.

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Hi

Post  sue on Sun Feb 14, 2010 6:59 am

Hi Team,
Just to let you know that I have sent a couple of e-mails via Wolf with links etc to help with this assignment.
Hope it is going well.
I will bring my copy of 'Psychologies' to the lecture of Tuesday for you to have a look at.
Enjoy the rest of the week-end,
Sue. flower

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Re: Week 3 feature profile thingy

Post  sue on Sun Feb 14, 2010 7:03 am

This link discusses the original remit for the magazine.

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Reply to Maria

Post  sue on Sun Feb 14, 2010 7:20 am

Hello Maria,
I have looked at the PDF document on readership figures.
Period covered is Oct 08 to Sept 09
Total readership: 359,000
ABC1: 274,000
C2DE: 85,000
Ages:
15-44: 206,000
45+: 152,000
Male readers: 41,000
female readers: 318,000

So, a magazine for younger women, who are better off.

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Re: Week 3 feature profile thingy

Post  Maria on Sun Feb 14, 2010 12:02 pm

Thanks Sue.

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Re: Week 3 feature profile thingy

Post  Hannah on Wed Feb 17, 2010 9:48 am

Hey guys, we still need our 2 paragraphs and some more 'added extras' the 'where' page also looks a bit bare, I'll send it round via email as to how it looks so far, but we need to get it done asap - I need to post it tonight as Sue has told me it has to be up by 1pm tomorrow, and I may still be in Realism at that time Sad

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Re: Week 3 feature profile thingy

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